Posts Tagged ‘leadership series’

Avoid Placing the Burden of Your Problems onto Other People-Leadership Tip

Daily Leadership Tip #5

For Day #5 of our daily Leadership Challenge, this is the fifth leadership principle in the Building Trust and Rapport Series, “Avoid Placing the Burden of Your Problems onto Other People“. We encourage you to apply each of the 28 daily leadership principles in this series by focusing on just a single principle every single day of the four-week challenge. This is the fifth leadership tip in the series and is one of the foundation principles in building trust and rapport with others. This series will also help you build more of a team culture within your workplace.

Avoid placing the burden of your problems on other people.

“A prudent man will think more important what fate has conceded to him, than what it has denied him.” –Baltasar Gracian

Have you ever known someone who, after any setback, had an excuse and typically laid the blame elsewhere? I’m ashamed to say that at one point in my life, I was one of those people. The economy is down. My sales manger is not distributing the “good” leads. Joe was responsible for that. I had one for any occasion. Luckily, at one point in my career, I had a good friend that sat me down and said, “You can continue to come up with more excuses, or you can solve the problem.”

It hit me like a ton of bricks. It wasn’t the economy, it wasn’t my sales manager, and it wasn’t Joe who was causing me to fail. I realized that every mistake or problem that had ever occurred in my life had one common variable. ME!

At that point, I took a really good look at myself. I looked at some of the mistakes I had made and asked myself, how can I avoid making the same mistake again? I used every obstacle as a learning experience. Don’t get me wrong, I still make excuses on occasion, but they are few and far between, and they no longer define me. Since I made that conscious decision, my career has really taken off.

There are actually some people out there who make themselves feel better by bringing other people down. They revel in their ability to know who had a heart attack, who is getting divorced, who is stealing office supplies, and more. The more they can bring other people down, the better that they feel.

Unfortunately, when the gossip starts, it’s easy to get caught up in it. My fourth-grade teacher, Mrs. Lofton used to say, “Misery loves company.” So just one person in your office with this type of mentality can cause the morale and team atmosphere in your office to drop like a stone.

Good leaders are the ones who stop this type of behavior in its tracks by just refusing to participate and standing up for coworkers who aren’t their to defend themselves. If you want to be a great leader, avoid placing the burden of your problems onto other people.

Principle #5: Avoid placing the burden of your problems on other people.

Week #1: Seven Ways to Build Trust and Rapport

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